What kind of mindset does your athlete have?

What kind of mindset does your athlete have?

What does AFL Superstar Dayne Beams, Brayden Crossley, Kurt Tippett, World Champions Ironwoman Courtney Hancock, Australian Boomers Basketball Rep Matt Hodgson and every other successful elite athlete I have coached have in common?

Brayden Crossley, Dayne Beams, Courtney Hancock and Matty Hodsgon all displayed the growth Mindset and helps contribute to why they are successful!

They all have a Growth Mindset.

In Carol Dwecks’ book called Mindset she discusses two different athletic mindsets.

Athletes with a Fixed Mindset believe that their talents and abilities are set and cannot be improved. They believe they have a certain amount of talent and that’s it. Athletes that exhibit this mindset may become too concerned with looking talented that they never reach their potential.

Athletes with a Growth Mindset perceive their talents and abilities as things that can be developed through effort, practice, and specialised coaching.

Gold Coast Suns Young Gun Brayden Crossley and  Collingwood Superstar Premiership Player, Best and Fairest Dayne Beams had dominant performances as juniors, yet their growth mindset ensured they were always looking for ways to enhance their performance which led them to the USP Gymnasium for a performance advantage!

Brayden Crossley Decreased his body fat by 8kgs in a 12 weeks!

Dayne increased his vertical jump by 29cm in 3 weeks and speed at USP PIT Gymnasium to ensure his high draft selection!

Courtney Hancock had won 2 Coolangatta Gold Titles in a row yet was not content to rest on her laurels and took her strength and performance to another level to take out the Coolangatta Gold for a 3rd time and placed 2nd in the nutri grain iron woman series.

Free Weight Exercises are perfect for Woman-check out elite champion iron woman Courtney Hancock push + Weight vest Technique

Australian Boomers Basketball Player Matt Hodgson  commitment to elite performance led him to THE UPS PIT Gymnasium where he had his best season ever and just renewed his contract for another 2 years with the Brisbane Bullets.

With the Mindset Rules outlined above, it is clear to see why athletes with a growth mindset thrive while those with a fixed mindset never reach their potential. The key to becoming an elite athlete is a willingness to learn, work hard and to acknowledge your weaknesses in order to become the best you can be!

Athletes with a Fixed Mindset believe they won’t be able to master a certain task, drill or exercise, while those with a Growth Mindset realize they may not succeed at first, but through sheer will and determination keep trying to learn and find a way to make themselves better.

So what can coaches and parents do to create and environment that fosters a growth mindset with their kids and players?

According to Dweck, “Praising children’s or adolescents’ intelligence or talent puts them into a fixed mindset with all of its defensiveness and vulnerability. Instead of instilling confidence, it tells them that we can read their intelligence or talent from their performance and that this is what we value them for. After praising their intelligence or talent, we found that students wanted a safe, easy task not a challenging one they could learn from.

We found that praising students’ effort or strategies (the process they engaged in, the way they did something) put students into a growth mindset, in which they sought and enjoyed challenges and remained highly motivated even after prolonged difficulty.

Take away point-If you have a player with a fixed mindset, before you work on their physical tools, you have to change their mindset. The mental has to come before the physical so they get outside their comfort zone to improve.

All the best,

Joey